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Prevent Fleas and Ticks

dog and cat

Time to Brush Up on Good Grooming

We all know the telltale signs. Itching, scratching, rubbing against furniture. If you’ve ever seen your pet with these symptoms or others indicating they are in discomfort, you’ll know that they may be suffering from some very unwelcome visitors. Fleas and ticks are a nuisance, and they aren’t always easy to get rid of, so it’s good to set a prevention plan and stick to it year-round. A good place to start? Grooming.

Brushing

Brushing helps you inspect your pet’s fur for pests. Publix has a variety of pet brush options available for both small and large pets. Once you have a good brush, start by separating a small section of your pet’s fur from the rest. Then brush in the opposite direction of their hair growth, diligently checking their fur and skin for pests as you go. Once you’ve finished that section, start on a new section until your pet has received a thorough examination. If your pet has short hair, this process may be a little more difficult, but it is no less important. Even short-haired pets aren’t immune from parasites.

Combing

After you’ve finished with the standard brush, you may also want to give your pet a once-over with a flea comb. Simply swipe the comb all over your pet, then wipe it off on a wet paper towel. If this leaves red or brown stains on the paper towel, your pet may have fleas and you’ll need to spring into action to stop the infestation. The flea comb is an excellent method of inspecting both short-haired animals and pets with dark fur who may not show pests as easily.

Washing

If you discover fleas or ticks on your pet while inspecting their fur, your next step is to give them a bath. While your pet may not enjoy bath time, they certainly will enjoy the sweet relief that comes with it. Flea and tick shampoos typically have different active ingredients; however, Publix has several options so you can find one that fits your needs. The problem doesn’t always end with a quick clean up, though. Because fleas and ticks can leave eggs and larvae throughout your entire home, not just on your pet, you’ll want to spray your house with a flea and tick spray specifically designed to kill and protect against a whole slew of critters.

Maintenance

Prevention is always the most important step in controlling a problem. Make sure you use a flea and tick medication on your pet as recommended to avoid having to go on pest patrol later. You could also use a flea and tick collar on your pet for an added layer of protection.

Sources:
Adams™ Flea and Tick Control. “Pet Grooming 101.”  Central Garden and Pet Company. Accessed May 30, 2018.
ASPCA, ed. “Fleas and Ticks.”  ASPCA.org. Accessed July 5, 2018.