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Publix Greenwise Market Magazine Jan. 2009
Publix GreenWise Market Magazine
Publix GreenWise Market

Publix GreenWise Market Magazine - Winter 2009

Go Whole

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If you're making the switch to whole grain bread, how do you know what to select? Many labeling terms make a product sound whole grain, but they can be misleading. To be certain, choose only products that list a whole grain like “whole wheat flour” (not just “wheat flour”) as the first ingredient. It’s even better if the second ingredient is also “whole” and if the bread has at least 3 grams of fiber per slice.

Keep in mind, though, that high fiber doesn’t automatically indicate whole grains. A bread can be made high-fiber with the addition of ingredients other than whole grains. Also note that color is not a reliable indicator either. Some breads appear dark because they contain molasses or a similar ingredient.

Confused? Look for the whole grain stamp on labels or consult this guide to common terminology:

WHOLE GRAIN INGREDIENTS:
  • Whole wheat
  • Whole rye
  • Whole oats
  • Bulgur
  • Graham flour
  • Oatmeal
NOT NECESSARILY WHOLE GRAIN INGREDIENTS:
  • 100% wheat
  • Harvest wheat
  • Stone-ground
  • Cracked wheat
  • Bran
  • Seven-grain
  • Wheat flourc
Mix & Match Granola
Whether for breakfast or an on-the-go snack, granola’s surprisingly simple to make. You can always swap out the ingredients to suit your taste, but why not start by building on this basic recipe.

Oat-Almond Granola 
3 cups rolled oats
½ cup sliced almonds
¼ cup organic canola oil
¼ cup organic maple syrup or organic honey
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon organic cinnamon
½ teaspoon salt
½ cup organic raisins

Mix together all ingredients except raisins. Spread in a shallow pan. Bake for 40 minutes at 325°F, turning granola every 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, stir in raisins and let cool. Store in an airtight container. Makes about 4 cups.

Variations on a Theme:
  • Replace all or some of the oats with rye, barley or wheat flakes.
  • Swap the almonds for chopped cashews, filberts or pecans.
  • Toss in some sunflower, pumpkin or sesame seeds.
  • Replace the raisins with dried cranberries, pineapple or papaya.
Plate CheckPlate Check
If you’re trying to shrink your waistline, shrink your dishes. Plates, bowls and glasses are 36% larger than they were in 1960, and research shows that bigger sizes encourage people to eat more. Switch to a smaller dish and you’ll likely eat less food while still feeling satisfied. “On a smaller plate, the food looks like more,” says Tara Gidus, R.D., a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. “That visual cue is important. You still think, ‘I’ve got a plate of food.’”

Gidus, who eats her own morning cereal from a mug to control the portion size, recommends measuring your dishes. Fill bowls and glasses with water, then pour the water into a measuring cup. Measure plates with a ruler. If your dishes are similar to today’s common 32-ounce bowls and 12-inch plates, consider replacing them with 16-ounce bowls and 9-inch plates.
Gluten-Free Breakfasts
Gluten-free products are popping up with increasing frequency. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Though most people can consume it without problems, it causes severe illness in people with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. The disease was once thought to be rare, but newer diagnostic tools show it occurs in one in 133 people.

“Awareness of the disease is increasing,” says Tricia Thompson, R.D., author of The Gluten-Free Nutrition Guide (McGraw-Hill, 2008). If you need to steer clear of gluten, read food labels carefully. “Choose foods that are gluten-free, not just wheat-free,” says Thompson. Look for most of these gluten-free products at your neighborhood Publix:

  • Amy’s Organic Tofu Scramble with Hash Browns & Veggies
  • General Mills Rice Chex
  • Nature’s Path EnviroKidz Amazon Frosted Flakes, Gorilla Munch, Koala Crisp and Peanut Butter Panda Puffs
  • Publix Frozen Southern Style Hash Browns
  • Publix Creamy and Publix Crunchy Peanut Butter
  • Publix GreenWise Market Plain, Chocolate and Vanilla Soymilk
  • Publix Milk and Publix GreenWise Market Organic Milk
  • Van’s Wheat Free Original, Blueberry and Apple Cinnamon Frozen Waffles
Disclaimer: Companies do change ingredients, so be sure to check labels before buying a product. Gluten may be hidden in caramel coloring, modified food starch and flavor enhancers. Gluten-free products may be contaminated if they are manufactured, processed, packaged or transported with equipment that comes in contact with gluten-containing foods. Check with the manufacturer if you have questions or concerns.

Learn More: You’ll find the “Gluten Free Guide” at the Information Center of your neighborhood Publix and gluten-free information at publix.com. (Click on Wellness & Pharmacy, then Food & Nutrition Center. For a gluten-free shopping list, click on The Right Foods for You.)
A Touch of MapleA Touch of Maple
No matter how you cut or roll it, a bowl of delicious whole grain oatmeal starts your day in a hearty way. Plus its soluble fiber helps to bind cholesterol, making it a healthful addition to your diet. Oatmeal comes in several forms. Rolled oats—oat kernels that have been steamed, then rolled and flaked—are the most familiar. Quick rolled oats are thinner, so they take less time to cook than regular. Instant oatmeal is made from very thin precooked oats, usually with salt and flavorings added. And steel-cut oats are the kernels chopped into small pieces. Keep several of these varieties on hand for breakfast, snacks and baking.

Making the Grade
Maple syrup is graded based on color and flavor:
Grade A Light Amber— Light, mild, delicate.
Grade A Medium Amber— A little darker, with more maple flavor.
Grade A Dark Amber— Dark and strong.
Grade B—Very dark and strong.
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